Food and Nutrition
Food and nutrition security is a complex issue with multiple environmental, social, cultural, political and economic determinants. They encompass components of availability, access and utilisation but also production, processing, distribution and consumption. The globalisation of food systems creates a wealth of conflicts and paradoxes, ethical considerations and dilemmas both in developed and developing countries. The complex patterns shaping what we consume, how we eat, who goes hungry, why this occurs and how food production and consumption shapes both planetary and human health is at the core the Centre’s research in this field. Current explanations of food and nutrition security tend to focus either on food production systems or the culture of consumption. The Centre examines an integrated understanding of food and nutrition security, adopting a more dialectic stance, that draws on both global political economy and social and cultural studies. Our researchers have observed that the full scale of food and nutrition must take into account local, national and global politics of food, its practices and cultural trends via the entire food chain from agricultural production to human consumption. Food and agriculture are primal aspects of life, they bind us to our planet and to one another. The Centre understands the many cultural and religious celebrations various aspects of food and agriculture bring to our lives and the importance in the connection; our research is to the betterment and knowledge base of the discipline at large. Further research can be found under the Politics of Food under Interdisciplinary Societal Studies.

Agricultural Issues
The large body of research that makes up the state-of-the-art of agricultural issues includes a wide variety of topics within agricultural development, economics and landuse. Our agricultural research is broadly categorised into key topics that include: (1) commodities and markets in which emphasis is put on production, marketing, consumption, value added, trade and price trends; (2) conservation and sustainability pracitices which is an overview of environmental policy, organic agriculture, concerns with climatic change, farmland conversion, impact and effectiveness of the agricultural easement from urbanisation and the increasing threat from invading insect, weed and other alien pests or animal diseases; (3) costs and returns of production for many agricultural commodities; (4) food security for a nutritionally adequate diet; (5) internationalisation relating to the effects of international markets and trade policy; (6) management in terms of mitigating strategies, covering areas such as crop choice, production, marketing, personnel and hired labour health and safety, agricultural labour management and labour relations; and (7) public policy that deals with government policies affecting policies relating to science and technology developments and the challenges facing agriculture in an e-commerce world. These broadly mapped out topics encompass many of the direct contemporary concerns the Centre has looked into. Specific research examples include: historical examinations of food crises, like the recent crisis that hit East Africa in 2011; sustainable agricultural practices in Australia; consumerism studies in Europe, tobacco land use practices in South America, livestock land use practices and agricultural methane output research in the USA, genetically engineered (or modified) food and seed germination practices in Australia and Canada and increases in obesity and the relationship to sugar consumption worldwide. The Centre recognises sound agriculture as a key to healthy living and its custodial balance with the land from where our food grows. 


CUMULATIVE INCIDENCE FOR LEPOTOSPIROSIS, RICE PADDY PLANTATION AND TOBACCO PLANTATION, BY MUNICIPALITY, RIO GRANDE DO SUL, BRAZIL, 2008-2012
 
LIVESTOCK IS A MAJOR SOURCE OF METHANE EMISSIONS IN THE USA
 

COUNTRIES GROWING GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS
 

SUGAR CONSUMPTION IN THE UK AND USA
RESEARCH
SUSTAINABILITY
HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
     DEVELOPING WORLD
     AFRICA
     ASIA
     LATIN AMERICA
     GLOBAL HEALTH
     REMOTE SENSING
     POPULATION MIGRATION
     TRANSPORTATION
     FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
     GIS
ENVIRONMENT INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIETAL STUDIES
INSTITUTIONAL COLLABORATION

























HISTORICAL PROJECTED DATA OF LA NIÑA PHENOMENON SIX MONTHS BEFORE ALMOST 10 MILLION PEOPLE IN THE HORN OF AFRICA FACED AN AGRICULTURAL DROUGHT


LAND USE OF AUSTRALIA BETWEEN 2005-2006, DEVELOPED IN 201
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