Backdrop to Global Health
Global health refers to problems that transcend national borders or that have a global impact. Global health research focuses on the interdependence of the health determinants, transnational health risks and policy responses of countries, role of international organisations and many other actors in the global health field. While economic growth, technological development and globalisation have brought unparalleled health and prosperity to some, these benefits have not been evenly distributed, and have come with significant social and ecological costs. More people are living under conditions of extreme poverty, hardship and disease. Changes associated with overpopulation, pollution, ecosystem degradation, war and conflict – remain a challenge to global health. The Centre’s research on global health addresses the linkages between health and social, economic, political and environmental factors. It acknowledges that solutions to health challenges will require contributions across disciplines, domains and sectors. Drawing on perspectives from anthropology and political science, the major topics of our research are on global health governance, global health initiatives, epidemiology and medical geography.

Medical Geography
Medical geography is well recognised as a subdiscipline within human geography. Its traditional focus is on the geography of diseases and medical resources. In recent years, medical geography has been relabelled as health geography where the new emphasis is on the geography of health and health care. These major themes emphasise the need to better understand and examine regional variation, cultural ecology and spatial modelling. The Centre has expert experience interlinking research between health and the environment; health and place; and health, health care and public policy. We have first-rate experience to methodological developments in medical and health geography and emphasise the growing importance of geographical information systems (GIS), spatial statistics, telehealth and qualitative approaches. The extent of our research consists of many varying aspects, including:
   ▪ diffusion of disease (e.g. via bodily fluids, airborne and food borne illnesses and migration)
   ▪ sanitation (e.g. the number one way to stop influenza is to wash your hands)
   ▪ distribution and diffusion of medical services (e.g. relating to insurance and access)
   ▪ epidemiology: the study of the causes, distribution and control of disease in populations
For example, if a disease is endemic, it is in its early stages and always present (e.g. dengue fever in Southeast Asia or yellow fever in South America); if a disease is epidemic, there are a few outbreaks and the situation gets more serious
(e.g. recent regional Ebola outbreak in West Africa or SARS in 2003); and if a disease is pandemic, this is a serious situation and it means that there is a global outbreak (e.g. HIV/Aids or the bubonic plague in the middle of 14th Century travelling the Silk Road from Asia to Europe).
SUSTAINABILITY
HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
     DEVELOPING WORLD
     AFRICA
     ASIA
     LATIN AMERICA
     GLOBAL HEALTH
     REMOTE SENSING
     POPULATION MIGRATION
     TRANSPORTATION
     FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
     GIS
ENVIRONMENT INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIETAL STUDIES
INSTITUTIONAL COLLABORATION







https://sites.google.com/a/polocentre.org/polocentre/research/human-geography/global-health/HealthRiskMap2015.pdf
HEALTH RISK MAP, 2015 [PDF FILE]




GLOBAL HEALTH FUNDING, 2015


TOP GLOBAL HEALTH TOPICS


BUBONIC PLAGUE ROUTES