DEVELOPING WORLD
AFRICA ASIA LATIN AMERICA
GLOBAL HEALTH REMOTE SENSING
POPULATION MIGRATION
TRANSPORTATION
FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS)

Population Studies
Our research provides a broad, interdisciplinary coverage of population research, and
offers an up-to-date and solid basis of information on the policy implications of recent research relevant to the causes and consequences of changing population size and composition. The Centre's demographic expertise using ethnographic methods, comparative-historical methods, discourse analysis and others methods considers population-related work as very important issue to global trends. The Centre's population scope includes demographic, economic, social, political and health research.

Population Dynamics
Among population researchers, demographers are concerned with the empirical study of population dynamics; that is, demographers study population determinants and consequences including size, composition, how populations change over time and the processes influencing those changes. Demographers deal with the collection, presentation and analysis of data relating to the basic life-cycle events and experiences of people: birth, marriage, divorce, household and family formation, migration, employment, ageing and death. They also examine compositions of populations by sex, age, race, ethnicity, occupation, education, religion, marital status and living arrangements. Demographers further assess the distribution of populations by region, country, province or state, urban or rural area and by neighbourhood. Most demographic data come from population censuses, vital registration systems, national registers and surveys. The Centre regularly utilises national census data for many of its operations. 

Migration: Why People Move
Most people move for economic reasons, but some migrate to escape political or religious persecution or simply to fulfil a personal desire for change. Some experts divide the many reasons people leave their homes for a new one into push and pull factors. Push factors might be widespread unemployment, lack of farmland, famine or war in their home area. The Great Depression (1929–1939) is a good example of a push factor, as hard times encouraged more residents to leave the United States than move in. In the 1980s and 1990s, hundreds of thousands of Africans were pushed out of their homelands to neighbouring countries because of famine and civil war. Factors that attract migrants are called pull factors. These include a booming economy, favourable immigration laws or free agricultural land to which the migrant is moving. For example, the labour shortage in Japan is pulling record numbers of legal and illegal immigrants to fill the low-status, low-paying or dangerous jobs Japanese natives reject. In order to keep a working population that can support Japan's elderly, it would need 17 million new immigrants by 2050, according to recent United Nations reporting. Other estimates have said Japan would need 400,000 new immigrants each year; however, the idea of increased immigration is not favourable to most Japanese.

EUROPE MIGRANT AND ASYLUM SEEKERS CRISIS, 2015-2016
EUROPE IS EXPERIENCING ONE OF THE MOST SIGNIFICANT INFLUXES OF MIGRANTS AND REFUGEES IN ITS HISTORY. PUSHED BY CIVIL WAR AND TERROR AND PULLED BY THE PROMISE OF A BETTER LIFE, HUGE NUMBERS OF PEOPLE HAVE FLED THE MIDDLE EAST AND AFRICA, RISKING THEIR LIVES. MORE THAN A MILLION MIGRANTS AND REFUGEES CROSSED INTO EUROPE IN 2015, WITH MORE THAN 140,000 PEOPLE ARRIVING IN THE FIRST TWO MONTHS OF 2016.

International Migration
In absolute numbers, international migration is at an all-time high. About 145 million people lived outside their native countries in the mid-1990s and that number increased to roughly 244 million in 2015. At present, the largest immigration flows are from Latin America and Asia into North America, and from Eastern Europe, the countries of the former Soviet Union, and North Africa into Northern and Western Europe. The Middle East draws migrants from Africa and Asia and hosts millions of refugees from within the region. There is considerable migration within Asia, Africa and Latin America. According to the United Nations Population Fund, migration is an important force in development and a high-priority issue for both developing and developed countries. In addition, almost half of all migrants are women, and most are of reproductive age. They have specific needs and human rights concerns. The Centre, in accordance with this issue, has been pushing for an increased understanding of migration issues, advocacy for better migration data and promoting the incorporation of migration into national development plans. We also advocate for addressing the special concerns of women and other vulnerable migrants, and work to meet the emergency reproductive health needs of refugees and internally displaced people. Furthermore, it noted baring, international migration is a global phenomenon that is growing in scope, complexity and impact. Migration is both a cause and effect of broader development processes and an intrinsic feature of our ever globalising world. While no substitute for development, migration can be a positive force for development when supported by the right set of policies. The rise in global mobility, the growing complexity of migratory patterns and its impact on countries, migrants, families and communities have all contributed to international migration becoming a priority for the international community.
RESEARCH
SUSTAINABILITY
HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
     DEVELOPING WORLD
     AFRICA
     ASIA
     LATIN AMERICA
     GLOBAL HEALTH
     REMOTE SENSING
     POPULATION MIGRATION
     TRANSPORTATION
     FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
     GIS
ENVIRONMENT INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIETAL STUDIES
INSTITUTIONAL COLLABORATION






GLOBAL POPULATION PROJECTION, 2050

EUROPE POPULATION DENSITY, 2011




MOVEMENTS OF PEOPLE: MIGRATION AND TOURISM











EUROPE MIGRANT CRISIS: SPAIN BUILT A VAST BORDER BETWEEN MOROCCO AND ITS ENCLAVE OF MELILLA.












EUROPE: MIGRATION ROUTES


SOUTHEAST ASIA: MIGRATION ROUTES