SOCIETY STUDIES
RIGHTS SOCIOECONOMICS POLITICS OF FOOD
GENDER
POVERTY AND AID
POLITICAL ECOLOGY
GEOPOLITICS

Gender and Development
Research on gender requires an understanding of what men and women do and how they relate to each other; it also is an understanding of the ideas, conceptions and socio-material contexts that motivate and organise gender roles. Gender roles, relations and perceptions are challenged by changing local, national and global circumstances. In terms of social change and development, gender can be associated with an approach that assumes that the variations in organisational forms and cultural patterns are to a large extent the outcome of the different ways in which men and women in a given context organisationally and cognitively deal with new situations and accommodate themselves to changing circumstances. Moreover, it draws the attention to the ways in which individuals and groups can contribute to and indeed modify patterns of local, regional and national development. The Centre conducts gender-related research that spans from international gender and development issues to ethnographic studies of male and female identities in changing social and natural environments. It focuses on emerging technologies and the effect it has on developed and developing countries. Specifically, we have background research from Australia, Nigeria, Russia, parts of Southeast Asia and southern Europe.

Family and the Welfare State
The notion of the welfare state focuses on family policies, gender equality and family change. Theoretically, the welfare state on gender perspectives assists and challenges the relationships of the family and individual. Issues that typify this research are employability and fertility, gender and class, personal relationships in families, family policies (e.g. parental leave, father quotas, publicly subsidised childcare services and cash for care benefits) and comparative statistical data (e.g. at national and international levels). In sociological terms, the conceptual theories of social role theory, role conflict, role attribution and social structureplay an important part in the family and its constructive relationship with the notions of the welfare state.

AUSTRALIA: STATISTICAL CASE STUDY

PROJECTED WELFARE SPENDING
FAMILIES: 1980-2010
Family: Development of Future Citizens
Almost every person in society starts life in a family of some kind. The type of family an individual grows up in, influences the type of person one grows up to be. In families, children first encounter concepts of right and wrong, as well as role models who shape their sense of what it is possible for them to do and be. Families are an important school of moral learning which often include inequality and subordination, not principles of justice. Plato, the Classical Greek philosopher, recognised the importance of the family for the moral development of individuals. His philosophical views had many societal implications, especially on the idea of an ideal state or government. Some of his most famous doctrines are contained in the Republic during his middle period, as well as in the Laws and the Statesman. Families inhibit or promote children's talents and abilities and parents play an extremely important role in the lives of their dependent children. For the development of future citizens, almost all countries regulate families to insure that all children are educated and have their basic needs met. This varies among countries but is true to the fact that no state can be indifferent to whether or not children grow up to be literate, functioning members of its economy. For this reason, all societies provide some degree of publicly financed education for its children. All states also depend, at least in part, on the labour of care-taking and childrearing, work that is done primarily, today, by women. Given its evident importance, feminists have made a strong case for taking such care-giving within the family seriously, and for the state to attend to the justice issues involved in care provision. They have also argued that just states must provide care in a way that ensures that all children, boys and girls, rich and poor, have equal opportunities to grow up able to take part in their society.
RESEARCH
SUSTAINABILITY
HUMAN GEOGRAPHY ENVIRONMENT
INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIETAL STUDIES
     SOCIETY STUDIES
     RIGHTS
     SOCIOECONOMICS
     POLITICS OF FOOD
     GENDER
     POVERTY AND AID
     POLITICAL ECOLOGY
     GEOPOLITICS
INSTITUTIONAL COLLABORATION









GENDER TRENDS: ADULT AND YOUTH LITERACY, (UNESCO, 2012)











































PUBLIC SOCIAL EXPENDITURE IN OECD COUNTRIES, PERCENTAGE OF GDP, 2013


PUBLIC SOCIAL EXPENDITURE IN OECD COUNTRIES, PERCENTAGE OF GDP, 2007 VERSUS 2014