GOVERNANCE CONSUMPTION ECOSYSTEM SERVICES GLOBALISATION
SUSTAINABILITY INDICES URBAN SUSTAINABILITY GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

What is Green Infrastructure?
Green infrastructure is a term that can encompass a wide array of specific practices, and a number of definitions. The US Environmental Protection Agency defines green infrastructure as a cost-effective, resilient approach to managing wet weather impacts that provides many community benefits. While single-purpose gray stormwater infrastructure – conventional piped drainage and water treatment systems – is designed to move urban stormwater away from the built environment, green infrastructure reduces and treats stormwater at its source while delivering environmental, social, and economic benefits. This definition is enlarged to support the various aspects that urban living needs to accommodate, including: downspout disconnection, rainwater harvesting, rain gardens, planter boxes, bioswales, permeable pavements, green streets and alleys, green parking, green roofs, urban tree canopy and land conservation. In all, green infrastructure is an approach to water management that protects, restores, or mimics the natural water cycle. Green infrastructure is effective, economical and enhances community safety and quality of life. It means planting trees and restoring wetlands, rather than building a costly new water treatment plant. It means choosing water efficiency instead of building a new water supply dam. It means restoring floodplains instead of building taller levees. Green infrastructure incorporates both the natural environment and engineered systems to provide clean water, conserve ecosystem values and functions and provide a wide array of benefits to people and wildlife.

Green Infrastructure: Scope
Green infrastructure occurs at all scales. While it's often closely associated with green stormwater management systems, which are smart and cost-effective, to some degree the Centre has been looking at it from a larger perspective. Green infrastructure can be a centrepiece of smart regional and metropolitan planning, ensuring communities have a liveable environment, with clean air and water, for generations to come. Green infrastructure can be designed to address the needs of wildlife, which are increasingly threatened by climatic changes and provide systems of corridors or greenways to enable movement through human settlements. Those corridors are often beautiful places that people find desirable and are associated with high-priced real estate. Green infrastructure includes park systems and urban forests. Trees are a critical piece in green infrastructural systems and shouldn't be discounted in favour of other technologies. Constructed wetlands are another way to harness nature to manage water locally and provide wildlife habitat. In all, smart communities are using green infrastructure for transportation systems (green streets), and green roofs, which can bring the benefits of nature to the built environment. The Centre has top-end research in green infrastructure research and relating its systems.
STRUCTURAL DESIGN OF A GREEN PLAZA





VISUAL OF A GREEN PLAZA





A GREENWAY, OR GREEN CORRIDOR, ZONE ILLUSTRATING THE USE OF A RETENTION, DETENTION AND INFILTRATION SYSTEM